"We have loved the stars too fondly to be fearful of the night"
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from foxpeach  126,949 notes
foxpeach:

i-love-astronomy-a-bit-much:

consumesouls:

i-love-astronomy-a-bit-much:

awkwarddly:

'as much as the moon needs the sun to exist, they cant be together.'

*trys really hard not to say anything contradicting*

"the moon needs the sun to exist" the fuck are you talking about

The sun will one day destroy the moon when it explodes. If anything the moon needs the sun NOT to exist.

maybe they meant that the moon only shines because it reflects the suns light

I don’t think the person who wrote this one their arm was thinking that.
Technically everything in the solar system reflects the sun light. And why would the sun and moon want to be together? The sun’s gravity will destroy the moon if they got too close.

foxpeach:

i-love-astronomy-a-bit-much:

consumesouls:

i-love-astronomy-a-bit-much:

awkwarddly:

'as much as the moon needs the sun to exist, they cant be together.'

*trys really hard not to say anything contradicting*

"the moon needs the sun to exist" the fuck are you talking about

The sun will one day destroy the moon when it explodes. If anything the moon needs the sun NOT to exist.

maybe they meant that the moon only shines because it reflects the suns light

I don’t think the person who wrote this one their arm was thinking that.

Technically everything in the solar system reflects the sun light. And why would the sun and moon want to be together? The sun’s gravity will destroy the moon if they got too close.

Reblogged from a2lexa  159 notes

a2lexa:

i-love-astronomy-a-bit-much:

Unpopular Astronomy Object of the Week: Earth’s “Other Moons”

Isn’t it amazing that Earth seems to be the only planet with only 1 moon? Well apparently, that’s false.

Earth has short-lived satellites, or "Mini-Moons".

A brief history on the discovery of Mini-Moons: In 2006, the Catalina Sky Survey of Arizona found an object orbiting Earth, a natural satellite other then the moon. It was named 2006 RH120, it was a tiny asteroid, but it fit the definition of a moon. But by June 2007, it was gone.

At least it was a rare isolated event, right? Wrong. It turns out, at any given moment, Earth has a natural satellite (other than the Moon) that is about 1 meter in diameter.

Also, if Mini-Moons aren’t enough, there are objects called "Quasi-satellites" that don’t exactly meet the qualifications for a moon or natural satellite. A example of a Quasi-satellite is Cruithne, which some people (incorrectly) call it Earth’s “Second Moon”.

this is interesting. Can anyone explain how the small object holds an orbit or rather, what gravitational force it is orbiting about?

The small objects usually have a orbit around the sun, but come too close to earth and gets locked into a short-lived, unstable orbit. These objects usually never orbit for more than 10 months. Because of the unstable orbit they fall into, they are easily pulled back into a solar orbit.

Unpopular Astronomy Object of the Week: Earth’s “Other Moons”

Isn’t it amazing that Earth seems to be the only planet with only 1 moon? Well apparently, that’s false.

Earth has short-lived satellites, or "Mini-Moons".

A brief history on the discovery of Mini-Moons: In 2006, the Catalina Sky Survey of Arizona found an object orbiting Earth, a natural satellite other then the moon. It was named 2006 RH120, it was a tiny asteroid, but it fit the definition of a moon. But by June 2007, it was gone.

At least it was a rare isolated event, right? Wrong. It turns out, at any given moment, Earth has a natural satellite (other than the Moon) that is about 1 meter in diameter.

Also, if Mini-Moons aren’t enough, there are objects called "Quasi-satellites" that don’t exactly meet the qualifications for a moon or natural satellite. A example of a Quasi-satellite is Cruithne, which some people (incorrectly) call it Earth’s “Second Moon”.